Thursday, February 1, 2018

February is Black History Month

The American story through the African American lens  https://nmaahc.si.edu/


YAC in collaboration with Miss Smith, Substitute Teacher for Mrs. Clay and Coach T. will be presenting stories of famous Oklahoma African Americans.

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1vI4e8L3DwFbz01EJOMqoJ5gigDO0GCjJb7Em-xGDMog/edit?usp=sharing



From Wikipedia

Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher (February 8, 1924 - October 18, 1995) was a key figure in the Civil Rights Movementin Oklahoma. She applied for admission into the University of Oklahoma law school in order to challenge the state's segregation laws and to become a lawyer.[1] She was born in Chickasha, Oklahoma and was the daughter of a minister, Rev. Travis B. Sipuel, and his wife, the former Martha Belle Smith.



John Hope Franklin (January 2, 1915 – March 25, 2009) was an American historian of the United States and former president of Phi Beta Kappa, the Organization of American Historians, the American Historical Association, and the Southern Historical Association. Franklin is best known for his work From Slavery to Freedom, first published in 1947, and continually updated. More than three million copies have been sold. In 1995, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.

Ralph Waldo Ellison (March 1, 1913[a] – April 16, 1994) was an American novelist, literary critic, and scholar. Ellison is best known for his novel Invisible Man, which won the National Book Award in 1953.[2] He also wrote Shadow and Act (1964), a collection of political, social and critical essays, and Going to the Territory (1986). For The New York Times, the best of these essays in addition to the novel put him "among the gods of America's literary Parnassus."[3] A posthumous novel, Juneteenth, was published after being assembled from voluminous notes he left after his death.

Hannah Diggs Atkins (November 1, 1923 – June 17, 2010) was a member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives from 1968 to 1980, and the first African-American woman elected to it. She was later appointed to the simultaneous positions of Secretary of State of Oklahoma and Secretary of Social Services, establishing her as the highest ranked female in Oklahoma state government until she retired in 1991.[1]

Charles Henry Christian (July 29, 1916 – March 2, 1942) was an American swing and jazz guitarist.

Christian was an important early performer on the electric guitar and a key figure in the development of bebopand cool jazz. He gained national exposure as a member of the Benny Goodman Sextet and Orchestra from August 1939 to June 1941. His single-string technique, combined with amplification, helped bring the guitar out of the rhythm section and into the forefront as a solo instrument. John Hammond[1] and George T. Simon[2]called Christian the best improvisational talent of the swing era. In the liner notes to the album Solo Flight: The Genius of Charlie Christian (Columbia, 1972), Gene Lees wrote that "Many critics and musicians consider that Christian was one of the founding fathers of bebop, or if not that, at least a precursor to it."[3]
Christian's influence reached beyond jazz and swing. In 1990, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in the category Early Influence.

In 2006 Oklahoma City renamed a street in its Bricktown entertainment district "Charlie Christian Avenue" (Christian was raised in Oklahoma City and was one of many musicians who jammed along the city's "Deep Deuce" section on N.E. Second Street).
Clara Shepard Luper was a civic leader, retired schoolteacher, and a pioneering leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. Wikipedia
DiedJune 8, 2011, Oklahoma City, OK



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Celebrating Black History Month

February 2018

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February is Black History Month, and serves as a time to honor and reflect on the expansive history, culture, struggles, accomplishments and contributions of the African American community.

You can use this time to bring service and learning together, challenging young people to educate themselves, share their knowledge and give back to their community.

Get started with resources below: