Friday, September 22, 2017

MD SEE Period & Facing Difference Students Rebuild 2017 Challenge

MIDDLE DIVISION SEE PERIOD Begins


The seventh and eighth graders enjoyed SEE Period at Andrew Johnson Elementary. They did partner reading and played Dolch sight word games with primary students at AndrewJohnson Elementary. Memories of SEE Period at Andrew Johnson HERE.


In the afternoon, a group of eighth graders had their SEE Period at Our Spot Head Start Program.   

Learning about Our Spot Head Start Program

The 8th-grade kids were prepared to use Dr. Javier Carrasco Literacy Lab Activities at Our Spot. Cyclones joined the children during their snack time and did activities to get to know each other.  Some Cyclones shared parts of Dr. Carrasco's Literacy Lab Activities.


Spelling our names game


The goal of this first visit was to get to know each other. 



The 8th-grade teachers supervising the activity stated that the SEE Period at Our Spot went very well. All involved enjoyed their time together.  


Facing Difference Students Rebuild Challenge Unveilled

On Peace Day, September 21, 2017, Students Rebuild unveiled its FACING DIFFERENCE CHALLENGE.





Students Rebuild is partnering with CARE and Search for Common Ground to support young people around the world in planting seeds of peace through facing, engaging, and celebrating our differences.

Why facing difference? Let’s be honest—facing difference can be hard. Whether it’s as simple as engaging across the generational lines or as deeply rooted as different faith beliefs and cultural values, it can be easiest to turn away from things that may challenge our views and simply “face” things that are familiar.

When we look around the world today, many of the challenges both big and small—from kids being isolated at school to some of the violent protests that happened this summer around the United States—stem from the inability to effectively engage people and ideas different from our own.

Cyclones are invited to consider their own identity and how they can act as peace-makers in Oklahoma City. They’ll also be supporting young people working towards peace in conflict areas in Nigeria, Sri Lanka, and in the South Caucasus region.

To support Cyclones learning through this Challenge,  Students Rebuild Challenge is providing educational resources to deepen understanding. There are new Project Based Learning Units from the Buck Institute of Education, a new virtual reality experience and increased virtual exchange conversations from Global Nomads Group (coming October 1st), and that’s just the beginning! 


Upper Division Casady Service Learning and Students Rebuild Challenge invite Oklahoma City Youth to make a highly personal piece of art, a self-portrait  The Bezos Foundation will match $3—largest match to date.  Since 2010, when Students Rebuild began, they have believed in the power of young people to make the world a better place. This year’s Challenge represents the “face” of who we are at our best—a community of hundreds of thousands who are doing what they can to create positive change and build peace.







For the past three years, the Casady Service-Learning Program has undertaken the Students Rebuild Challenge as its Global Youth Service Day Project.  The first year, sophomore Ananya Bhaktaram brought the literacy challenge to YAC (Youth Active in the Community).  YAC sent over 7,000 bookmarks and provided funding for literacy programs in Peru and Indonesia.  Ananya connected to her Temple, family, friends and Boys and Girls Club at Memorial Park.  Casady Cyclones were featured in the Global Nomands teleconference with Peru and had the opportunity to see the bookmarks delivered to the children in Andahuaylas, Peru.  


In 2015, Cyclones Mallory W. and Gabrielle M. facilitated the Healing Classroom Challenge making 600 pinwheels in collaboration with Boys and Girls Club at Memorial Park which supported Syrian Youth Refugee healing programs.  

The Healing Classroom Pinwheel Exhibit at the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles is an interactive installation of the youth-made pinwheels that were donated to support Syrian children learn, heal, and grow through the Students Rebuild Healing Classrooms challenge. For every handmade pinwheel mailed, the Bezos Family Foundation donated $2 – totaling $400,000 – to support the International Rescue Committee’s Healing Classrooms program. For Syrian children, Healing Classrooms provides a secure, nurturing environment that helps them learn, heal, and grow. 

To generate more awareness, a group of students at Montlake Elementary School in Seattle, Washington, designed this interactive museum installation in the spring of 2017 using pinwheels submitted for the Challenge.

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In 2016, Gabrielle and Mallory facilitated the Youth Uplift Challenge. 3,000 decorated hands, a resulting collaboration with YAC, Boys and Girls Club at Memorial Park and Oklahoma Centennial High School, Consumer Science and Technology Class were mailed in April 2016. The hands were match with funding to provide training for youth in Indonesia and Nicaragua.  Check out the Student Impact Report for the Youth Uplift Challenge!




This summer, Students Rebuild partnered with DEC artists and L.A.-based street artist Teachr to host Youth Uplift L.A., where Teachr showcased a unique and interactive art piece featuring the creative, colorful, and thoughtful hands!