Friday, March 6, 2015




The President Volunteer Service Award (PVSA) is an initiative of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) and is administered by the Points of Light Foundation. With a shared mission of inspiring more to answer the call to service, PVSA celebrates the impact we can all make in bettering our communities and our world.


Presidential recognition sets volunteers apart from peers. It is a tremendous honor. Even though volunteers may not seek recognition, their example can deliver a powerful message that encourages others to take action.
The President’s Volunteer Service Award recognizes United States citizens and lawfully admitted, permanent residents of the United States who have achieved the required number of hours of service over a 12-month time period or cumulative hours over the course of a lifetime.
Criteria

  • Recipient(s) must be a United States citizen or a lawfully admitted permanent resident of the United States.
  • Awards are issued for service hours served within a 12-month time period or over the course of a lifetime.
  • Awards are issued for volunteer service only; additional levels of participation with the organization (i.e., charitable support) are not a factor considered for the award.
  • Court-ordered community service does not qualify for the award.
  • Awards are issued by approved Certifying Organizations.
  • Service must be with an approved Certifying Organization that is legally established in the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico or one of the U.S. territories.
New Eligibility Criteria for 2014-2015
Individuals, families and groups that meet the criteria are eligible for the PVSA.
Hours are measured over a 12-month period and awards are designated based on cumulative hours. The awards are offered in multiple levels and are designed to recognize each milestone of your service achievement. Levels include bronze, silver, gold and the highest honor, the President’s Lifetime Achievement Award for those who contribute more than 4,000 hours of service in their lifetime.
Hours by AwardBronzeSilverGold
Kids (5-10)
26 – 49
50 – 74
75 +
Teens (11–15)
50 – 74
75 – 99
100 +
Young Adults (16-25)
100 – 174
175 – 249
250 +
Adults (26 and older)
100 – 249
250 – 499
500+
Families and Groups*
200 – 499
500 – 999
1,000+
President’s Lifetime Achievement Award: Individuals who have completed 4,000 or more hours in their lifetime
* Two or more people, with each member contributing at least 25 hours toward the total



The Service-Learning Office will order awards the week of March 9, 2015. Volunteers need to create a file at the award website and link it to Casady as Certifying Organization using the record of service key: SCW-0931.  Awards are ordered directly from the Casady link in the PVSA website.

To make a personal file linked to Casady as certifying organization 

a. Go to http://www.presidentialserviceawards.gov/.  Go to volunteers and create a profile by clicking on Get started now and Register.  Complete all require and optional areas.  Write your password so you will be able to update your file in the future.

b. To set your record of service.   
  1. Choose your age level: Teens: 15 - years old.  Young Adult 16+.   
  2. Place the Casady Record oService Key in your profile SCW-0931.   The Casady ROS key connects the Casady's file to the volunteer file and allows the Service-Learning Office to certify hours and order awards.
  3.  Record your volunteer experiences and hours: Enter one experience at the time.  After typing your activity, add what you did and how did you grow.  One sentence each.  This is the only time when we ask you to reflect your giving of time to the community in need.
  4. In the calendar, place the date you began the activity and the total number of hours.  DO NOT apply FILTERS!  
  5. Save and add another activity.  When you are finished.  SAVE! You will see your full file, number of hours and level of award earned.   The Service-Learning Office verifies hours, reads  reflections, and  orders award.
  6. SEND an e-mail to Mrs. Clay clayc@casady.org stating that your record of service is in the system for her to certify your hours and order your award with the Casady Group.  No awards are ordered individually!

Cyclones receiving the Presidential Awards list forthcoming.  The inspirational UD guest Chapel speaker on April 21,2015 -date of delivery of awards- is Mr. Gene Rainbolt.









About Mr. Rainbolt's life and his focus on helping children through education


H.E. "Gene" Rainbolt spent a lifetime building banks in Oklahoma, until the day he stepped away and focused his energy on helping children.
Rainbolt devotes himself and his philanthropy to many activities, but his greatest interest is in children, said his friend, Judge Robert Henry, OCU President.
Perhaps Rainbolt helps now because adults helped him as a child during the Depression.
Perhaps he helps because the faces of orphans he saw during the Korean War haunt him still.
Perhaps it is all of this and more.
"Gene turned his incredible mind and heart to bettering the soul of Oklahoma on more than a 40-hour a week basis," Henry said in paying tribute last month to Rainbolt when he received the Jasmine Award for his support of children's causes and the Jasmine Moran Children's Museum in Seminole.
Rainbolt, 74, is chairman of the board of BancFirst, which has 41 banks in Oklahoma.
He still goes to work at the BancFirst office in downtown Oklahoma City every day, but says that except for participating in some of the management committees, "I am not a factor in our operation."
Banking on the future Rainbolt has a track record of success in banking, working first at a bank in Noble as a young man, then in Purcell, later running Federal National Bank in Shawnee for more than 20 years before becoming chairman of BancFirst, now run by his son, David.
Judge Henry is not the only person who says Rainbolt's passion is helping children.
Nance Diamond, president of the Oklahoma Arts Institute, said that some years ago she and another supporter of the institute approached Rainbolt, a longtime family friend, about serving on the board.
"He very clearly explained that the only boards he was joining were those that served children," Nance said.
Rainbolt agreed to serve on the board of the institute, which provides a summer arts academy for students 14 to 18 years old, and workshops for teachers and educators.
"The focus really is on expanding the creative talent of young people," Diamond said. "I think Gene Rainbolt is about creating change, and what he wants to see happen is creating more opportunity for young people in Oklahoma."
Rainbolt attributes his interest in children to his own experiences in life.
"We change society by directing our attentions to children and the environment in which they develop, and thus, I decided I wanted to devote my energies to things that impacted children," he said.
He and his family have endowed a chair in child psychiatry at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.
He's involved in Calm Waters, which provides support groups for children who have suffered from the death of a sibling, parent or grandparents, or who are in a family where there is a divorce.
'It takes a village ... ' Rainbolt was born in and grew up in Norman.
His father, a salesman for a wholesale grocery, moved the family there so the children could go to the University of Oklahoma.
From his earliest memories, he had some kind of a job.
"Every day of my life, including now, I had people who wanted to help me succeed and were willing to help me, which accounts for my use of the sometimes maligned term, 'that it takes a village to raise a child.' I really understand that based on my personal experience," Rainbolt said.
Besides his parents, others who influenced him were teachers and Norman business people and Jim Murphy, who was chairman of the finance department at OU when Rainbolt was in college.
He studied economics at OU because it interested him, he said.
After graduation, Rainbolt was commissioned a lieutenant in the Army artillery and went to Korea, where he was on an artillery battalion staff, serving as the adjutant and battalion S-2, intelligence officer.

Information from Google Search